Curated by Pamela Russell and Sheila Flaherty-Jones
February 7th, 2014 | 9:00am

Sidney Waugh was a twentieth-century sculptor best known for architectural and large-scale works on the one hand, and for smaller designs for glass and medallions on the other. As lead creative artist at Steuben Glass in New York, he elevated glass to a fine art medium, while also designing many public and private monuments on the East Coast of the United States. Waugh worked in a style typical of the 1930s and 1940s that owed much to the Art Deco aesthetic, emphasizing symmetry and simple, linear forms.

Image of Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost "Poetic Dialogue" silhouettes courtesy of Philip Chapman-Bell on Flickr Creative Commons.
February 6th, 2014 | 8:00am

Image of Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost "Poetic Dialogue" silhouettes courtesy of Philip Chapman-Bell on Flickr Creative Commons.

The first Thursday of each month, The Common showcases an audio recording of a poem from our print issue archive, read by the author.  This month, Corinna McClanahan Schroeder reads "Miss Ohio Teaches You To Drive," originally published in Issue 02.

Photo by Flickr Creative Commons user Christopher Sessums
Juan Antonio González Iglesia Trans. Curtis Bauer
February 5th, 2014 | 9:00am

Photo by Flickr Creative Commons user Christopher Sessums

 

Álvaro Mutis habla lentamente.

Una entrevista en un canal hispano.

Me interesa el desgaste de las cosas.

Me interesa el desgaste de los héroes.

February 4th, 2014 | 9:00am

Joshua Mehigan, whose poems “How Strange, How Sweet” and “Believe It” appear in Issue 06 of The Common, was born and raised in upstate New York. His poems have been published in a variety of journals and magazines, including Poetry Magazine, Ploughshares, The New Republic, Parnassus: Poetry in Review, and The New York Times. His most recent book, The Optimist, was published in 2004 by the Ohio University Press and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prive. His second book, Accepting the Disaster, is forthcoming in July 2014 from Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 

February 3rd, 2014 | 9:00am

Hello, everybody. My name is Julia, and I am becoming an Internet genealogy addict. I don’t believe in higher powers, except, like, the NSA and the IRS. So I must rely on my failing willpower. Unless you find a rich uncle, Internet genealogy is hard to justify as useful. Why should I care that four hundred years ago, some remote ancestor was a rabbi in Moravia? Geni.com, where I listed my family tree, says it has 74,346,170 people on its site. I’m already up to 1,820 blood relatives.