Fayum Portrait

by JAMES HOCH

             [Field Manual]

Sunday, there she goes again, toddling
             out the door, off the back deck, tumbling

in her church dress, a field of hand-
             painted green stems and yellow flowers,

so that stunned, staggering forward—
            Brother, no IED, no gag a god pulls,

today, no one dies. It’s just sky,
            dress, sky. There’s no manual for this—
 

[Purchase Issue 14 here.]
 

James Hoch‘s poems have appeared in The New Republic, The Washington Post, Slate, Chronicle Review, American Poetry Review, New England Review, the Kenyon Review, Tin House, and Ploughshares. His books are A Parade of Hands and Miscreants. Currently, he is a professor of creative writing at Ramapo College of New Jersey and guest faculty at Sarah Lawrence.

Isabel MeyersFayum Portrait

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The Common’s 10 Most-Read Pieces of 2017

It seems only fitting to give one last nod to the fantastic pieces that we brought out in 2017. Below is a list of our most-read pieces of the year: the poems, essays, interviews, and art that made 2017 our biggest year yet for web traffic from around the world! We hope you'll have a look, if you haven't already, and see why this work struck a chord with readers this year.

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December 2017 Poetry Feature

ALBERTO de LACERDA
To see you is to stay and remain, / To see you is finally to see; / I open my veins to life / As if an exceptional body / Desired my blood. / I discover everything in you. / You look in my eyes: you are / The liquid filling / The bridges of heaven and earth. / To see you is to forget fear, / To speak and not see the divisions / Words create. / To see you is to be a forest.