Believe It

By JOSHUA MEHIGAN 

 

Hard to believe that, after all of it,

in bed for good now, knowing you haven’t done

one thing of any lasting benefit

or grasped how to be happy, or had fun,

 

you must surrender everything and pass

into a new condition that is not

night, or a country, or a sleep, or peace,

but nothing, ever, anymore, for you.

Joshua Mehigan, whose poems “How Strange, How Sweet” and “Believe It” appear in Issue 06 of The Common, was born and raised in upstate New York. His poems have been published in a variety of journals and magazines, including Poetry Magazine, Ploughshares, The New Republic, Parnassu: Poetry in Review, and The New York Times. His most recent book, The Optimist, was published in 2004 by the Ohio University Press and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize He currently lives in Brooklyn, New York.
Believe It

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