Love Song (1)

By MARCUS MYERS

 

If our bodies are vessels, hers sailed away.
I am sunken eleven months deep, away from her
hazel eyes like aulos pipers for my oarsmen,
           away from her
sun-warmed sides and bronze-sheathed prow.
Before she sank me, we rowed a while together
and she seemed to like the wake we made.
She said I was always too heavy, though.
She said, Where’s the levity?
She said when we talked, we dove too deep,
           too fast,
into the abyssal zone
where things get weird.
The bottom of what I feel for her: a fleet ship
weighted centuries-deep
with the wine- and honey-laden amphora
           we once carried together.
The weight of what I feel for her, the cedar-
pitch timber of it, will never surface
           to lift the bright air
pushing against our sails again.

 

Marcus Myers lives in Kansas City, where he teaches and serves as co-founding editor of Bear Review. His poems have appeared in or are forthcoming from The Cortland ReviewThe Florida ReviewHunger MountainLaurel ReviewMid-American ReviewThe National Poetry ReviewRHINOSalt HillTar River Poetry, and elsewhere.

 

[Purchase Issue 19 here.]

Love Song (1)

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