Motel

By ZACK STRAIT

 

There is a dark blue bible in the nightstand, a pitcher and torch

stamped on the cover in gold. I rub this symbol

with my thumb and I am comforted, knowing another

man was in this room before me, just to

place his light here. I take a seat on the bed, the verses rustling

in my lap like dry leaves as I open to the psalm

about our bodies, how they rise in the morning, settle

on the far side of the sea. And still love

follows us. Next door, two people are moaning. I turn the page.

 

[Purchase Issue 13 here]

Zack Strait is pursuing his PhD at Florida State University. His work has recently appeared in Ploughshares

Julia PikeMotel

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