All posts tagged: Poetry Recordings

We Used To Call it Puerto Rico Rain

By WILLIE PERDOMO

The rain had just finished saying, This block is mine.

The kind of rain where you could sleep through two breakthroughs and still have enough left to belly sing in the ambrosial hour.

Blood pellets in the dusk & dashes of hail were perfect for finding new stashes; that is to say, visitations were never announced.

A broken umbrella handle posed a question by the day care center.

Avery FarmerWe Used To Call it Puerto Rico Rain
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Buscando un árbol que me de sombra

By SAMUEL MIRANDA


In conversation with A Hill in the South Bronx, by Perla de Leon

Estoy buscando un árbol que me de sombra
Porque el que tengo me lo van a cortar
                                  Coro de bomba

This building stands,
the last tree to be cut down
in a garden of brick and steel
made desert of rubble and dust.

Debbie WenBuscando un árbol que me de sombra
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Bounty

By RICARDO ALBERTO MALDONADO



21 de septiembre de 2017: “pero estamos vivos”

One: home
Two: home                  dos tres dos tres          two: Mother.

One lápiz. One pen. One ocean between us. Six: Home.

Seven: FEMA: four thousand more,
I recite.

I state I am large; we are to be
larger.                          Uno dos tres siete dieciséis cuatro mil
más
I begin with. I begin dentro de mí, dentro

de nosotros.

I accuse one man. Two men. Three men. Men men. State
men. I accuse whomever I find

I found. I found. Mother, I foundered.

I wanted that truth: one ocean more, one home more
than a wave is glass.

I am one man, more large and savager.

Two men. Three Men. State four, mother. State five. State

state. State, dios te salve, en mí, madre. En tí, dios te salve.

 

Ricardo Alberto Maldonado was born and raised in Puerto Rico. He is the translator of Dinapiera Di Donato’s Collateral (National Poetry Series) and the recipient of poetry fellowships from Queer|Art|Mentorship, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and CantoMundo. He is managing director at the 92Y Unterberg Poetry Center.

 

[Purchase Issue 16 here.]

Emily EverettBounty
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Breaking Night

By WILLIE PERDOMO

"De Puerto Rico: Un Ano Despues de la Tormenta"

In that year of a shot to the head where were you the first time you broke night?

When you break night, you learn that one puff, under the right circumstance, can give you the right perspective.

You learn to pick up stories that fall & slip on the right side of knowing.

Avery FarmerBreaking Night
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February 2018 Poetry Feature

un/bodying/s

Poetry by TODD HEARON
Music by GREGORY W. BROWN

“I have made
an elegy for myself it
is true”

                        Geoffrey Hill, i.m., 1932 – 2016

1.  The Meeting of the Waters

Sempiternal waters, sing-
ly sing, gush glottal-less & all
onomatopoetical your
triphthong’s liquid pluraling
through rock & ruck & rill

Julia PikeFebruary 2018 Poetry Feature
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March 2017 Poetry Feature

At The Common we’re welcoming spring with new poetry by our contributors. (Be sure to listen to the audio link to Megan Fernandes’ “White People Always Want to Tell Me…,” read by the author.)

Sarah WhelanMarch 2017 Poetry Feature
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January 2016 Poetry Feature

New Work for the New Year

This month we welcome Cassandra Cleghorn to our pages, presenting poems included in her first book, Four Weathercocks, which will be published by Marick Press in March. We’re also happy to be welcoming back TC contributors David Lehman, Jonathan Moody, and Sylvie Durbec. Lehman’s new book is Sinatra’s Century: One Hundred Notes on the Man and His World. Jonathan Moody won the Cave Canem Northwestern University Press Prize for his collection Olympic Butter Gold, published in November 2015. The book includes five poems first published in The Common. Jean Follain Prize-winner Sylvie Durbec’s poem “Shining Red in the Torrent” is offered here in its entirety, translated by Denis Hirson. An excerpt from the poem was published in The Common Issue 10.

Julia PikeJanuary 2016 Poetry Feature
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