No Bad Things

Artist: C-MACKENZIE
Curated by AMY SANDE-FRIEDMAN

C-MacKenzie, Pool Party 03, 2011

C-MacKenzie, Pool Party 03, 2011

C-MacKenzie (Chris MacKenzie) removes the background imagery from his photographs, creating uncanny visions of people in surreal blank settings. Although his figures often assume the pose of spectators, they gaze upon nothingness. In creating these images, C-MacKenzie draws on his background in motion picture editing and post production, in which mistakes are removed from an image and figures are pasted to scenery. He envisions his artistic process as “withholding information” from the viewer.  By negating the sense of place, C-MacKenzie creates an unknowable and mysterious world.

C-MacKenzie, Pool Party 01, 2011

C-MacKenzie, Pool Party 01, 2011

C-MacKenzie, Pool Party 02, 2011

C-MacKenzie, Pool Party 02, 2011

C-MacKenzie, Pool Party 03, 2011

C-MacKenzie, Pool Party 03, 2011

 

C-MacKenzie, No Bad Things 1, 2011

C-MacKenzie, No Bad Things 1, 2011

 

C-MacKenzie, No Bad Things 2, 2011

C-MacKenzie, No Bad Things 2, 2011

 

C-MacKenzie, No Bad Things 3, 2011

C-MacKenzie, No Bad Things 3, 2011

 

C-MacKenzie (Chris MacKenzie) was born in Trenton, Ontario, and received a BFA from Concordia University in Montreal.

Julia PikeNo Bad Things

Related Posts

Image by Alaa Tawalbeh

From the Jane Doe Series

ALAA TAWALBEH
Alaa Tawalbeh was born in Amman in 1980. He works with acrylics and inks, exploring the expressions of the human face, especially those related to stupidity. He generally refuses to exhibit his work in galleries. Tawalbeh is also a computer programmer.

Untitled From the Room 11 Series

From the Room 11 Series

RAFIK MAJZOUB
Rafik Majzoub is a distinguished painter and graphic artist, born 1971 in Amman, Jordan. He is a self-taught “outsider artist” who claimed an important role in the Lebanese art scene after he moved to Beirut in 1992. Majzoub’s dexterity thrives through tension, impatience and velocity.

Beauty Rest, from House Beautiful: Bringing the War Home 1967-72.

Home Invasion

MARTHA ROSLER
From the inception of her career, Rosler has maintained her investigation into the distribution and reception of mass-produced images, using the collage format to layer disparate images—from fashion, advertising, lifestyle, politics, and war—to suggest the simultaneity and co-dependence of seemingly distinct realities.