Reading Place: Last Gasp of Winter

This time of year, I’m always hoping for one last snowstorm or cold snap. I love winter, and am always sad to see it go. To give the season a proper goodbye, these links celebrate all things cold things cold and snowy:

At Brevity, Amy Butcher reflects on ice skating.

At The New York Review of Books, Ian Frazier reviews a new anthology of writing about the Arctic.

Did you know there is some debate as to whether or not bears actually hibernate in winter? Slate investigates—and also fills you in the sex lives of bears, in case you were wondering.

I live near a cruise ship terminal where the Queen Mary 2 docks, and so I’ve always been curious what it would be like to take it all the way to England. At the New York Times, book reviewer Dwight Garner describes a winter crossing.

Keith Gessen embarks on a considerably less luxurious wintry crossing when he travels with a bulk carrier ship on its journey from Murmansk, Russia, to China. The ship takes a northern route through the Arctic Circle—a route that has only recently been possible, as a result of global warming.

Finally, an elegy for snow.

 

Hannah Gersen is the Dispatches Editor of The Common.

 

Reading Place: Last Gasp of Winter

Related Posts

Movie poster

Film Review: Through the Night

HANNAH GERSEN
I didn’t have much awareness of overnight childcare centers until I watched Through the Night, a documentary about a married couple, Deloris and Patrick Hogan, who run Dee’s Tots, a 24-hour daycare in New Rochelle, New York.

Headshot of Nina Kossman

Report Card

NINA KOSSMAN
Seven years after their graduation, most of my father’s German classmates and their parents were forced to accept Hitler’s so called “Volksdeutsche” invitation and migrated to Germany, many of them losing everything they had, including of course, their homes in Latvia.

Headshot of Lisa Lee Herrick

Excerpt from Endangered Animals

LISA LEE HERRICK
In the US, no one cared much that thousands of Chinese—let alone South Koreans, Vietnamese, and others—were overflowing hospitals across the ocean. It was only when an outbreak ravaged a posh, Alpine city in northern Italy that the troubling thought emerged: If it could happen there, it can happen here, too, because they look like us.