All posts tagged: LaToya Faulk

2021 Festival of Debut Authors

On March 25th at 7:00pm, in honor of ten years of publishing and cultivating new voices, please join The Common‘s special events team for an evening devoted to emerging talents! Celebrate with poets and prose writers Ama Codjoe, Sara Elkamel, LaToya Faulk, Ben Shattuck, Angela Qian, and Ghassan Zeineddine. This event will take place virtually via Zoom.

This inaugural festival features readings and conversation, and aims to to raise scholarship funds for the magazine’s Young Writers Program. All contributions will be matched by the Whiting Foundation.

Register for the event, hosted by Tess Taylor, Katherine Vaz, and JinJin Xu, here

REGISTER

 

Ama codjoe Ama Codjoe is the author of Blood of the Air (Northwestern University Press, 2020), winner of the Drinking Gourd Chapbook Poetry Prize, and Bluest Nude forthcoming from Milkweed Editions in 2022.She has been awarded support from Cave Canem, Jerome, Robert Rauschenberg, and Saltonstall foundations as well as from Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, Crosstown Arts, Hedgebrook, and MacDowell. Her recent poems have appeared in The Best American Poetry, Prairie Schooner, The Yale Review, and elsewhere. Among other honors, Codjoe has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council/New York Foundation of the Arts, and the Bronx Council on the Arts. Read her Issue 18 poem, “Burying Seeds,” here

 

 

Sara elkamelSara Elkamel is a poet and journalist living between her hometown, Cairo, and New York City. She holds an MA in arts journalism from Columbia University and is currently an MFA candidate in poetry at New York University. Elkamel’s poems have appeared in The Common, Michigan Quarterly Review, Four Way Review, The Boiler, Memorious, wildness, Nimrod International Journal, and as part of the anthologies Best New Poets 2020, Halal If You Hear Me and 20.35 Africa, among other publications. Elkamel was named a 2020 Gregory Djanikian Scholar by The Adroit Journal, and a finalist in Narrative Magazine‘s 30 Below Contest. Read her Issue 19 poem, “The Way Cacti Quiver,” here.

 

 

Latoya faulk

LaToya Faulk has a BA in English Literature and a MA in Rhetoric and Writing from Michigan State University. She is a third-year MFA student at the University of Mississippi. Her work has been published in Scalawag, Amherst College’s The Common, and Splinter Magazine‘s Think Local series. She currently lives in Oxford, Mississippi, with her two children. Read her Issue 20 essay, “In Search of a Homeplace,” here

 

 

 

Ben shattuckBen Shattuck (b. 1984) is a graduate and former Teaching-Writing Fellow of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. He is the director of the Cuttyhunk Island Writers’ Residency and the curator of the Dedee Shattuck Gallery. He is the recipient of a PEN America Best Debut Short Story Award and a Pushcart Prize. His writing can be found in the Harvard Review, The Common, the Paris Review Daily, Lit Hub, Kinfolk Magazine, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and other publications. His essay collection—following Henry David Thoreau’s walks throughout New England—will be published by Tin House in May 2022. He lives on the coast of Massachusetts, where he owns and runs a general store built in 1793. Read his Pushcart Prize-winning Issue 16 story, “The History of Sound,” here

 

 

Angela Qian is a cross-genre writer whose work has appeared in Pleiades, Witness, The Common, Gay, Wax Nine, Asymptote and other outlets. She has received honors from the Norman Mailer Foundation and is a Pushcart Prize nominee. She received her MFA in fiction at NYU and was a co-curator of The Sweet & Sour Readings. Currently, she is at work on a short story collection about digital intimacy, double eyelid surgery, and dating sims, as well as a novel.Find her website at angelaqian.com. Read her Issue 17 story, “Wild Oranges,” here

 

 


Ghassan ZeineddineGhassan Zeineddine
is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, where he teaches Arab American literature and creative writing. His fiction has appeared and/or is forthcoming in The Georgia Review, Witness, Pleiades, Fiction International, The Common, Epiphany, and the Iron Horse Literary Review, among other places. He is currently co-editing the creative nonfiction anthology Voices of Arab Detroit (Wayne State University Press, 2021). He lives with his wife and daughter in Dearborn. Read his Issue 17 story, “The Reincarnates,” here.

 

2021 Festival of Debut Authors
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Friday Reads: LaToya Faulk

By LATOYA FAULK

 

In this special, mid-month edition of Friday Reads, Issue 20 contributor LaToya Faulk shares her recent recommendations and reflects on motherhood in the pandemic, entering discussions on race and queerness with her daughter, and the life-altering power of babies. Take a read and make sure to grab your copy of Issue 20 here.

Recommendations: Little Labors by Rivka Galchen; The Only Black Girls in Town by Brandy Colbert; Memorial Drive by Natasha Tretheway; Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journey into Race, Motherhood, and History by Camille T. Dungy

 

Since March, I’ve been home with my precious and verbose seven-year-old girl. It’s mostly me and her, so mothering feels more immediate. Such immediacy has a way of repositioning the self-as-reader, and I’ve found refuge in the declarative work of writers who incite new ways of understanding how to parent in the blissfulness of childrearing and the failures of it too, especially under the precarious times of a pandemic. With this, books like Rivka Galchen’s Little Labors, Brandy Colbert The Only Black Girls in Town, Natasha Tretheway’s Memorial Drive, and Camille T. Dungy’s Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journey into Race, Motherhood, and History bring me closer to understanding the many ways we imprint ourselves upon our children, and how they equally imprint themselves upon us.

Friday Reads: LaToya Faulk
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In Search of a Homeplace

By LATOYA FAULK

 

When we identify respect (coming from the root word meaning “to look at”) as one of the dimensions of love, then it becomes clear that looking at ourselves and others means seeing the depths of who we are. Looking into the depths, we often come face-to-face with emotional trauma and woundedness. Throughout our history, African Americans have pounded energy into the struggle to achieve material well-being and status, in part to deny the impact of emotional woundedness. Truthfully, it is easier to acquire material comfort than to acquire love.
—From Salvation: Black People and Love, by bell hooks

 

Home is not just a house; it’s this yearning for a place where you’re safe, [a place where] nobody’s going to hurt you.
—Toni Morrison, in conversation with Claudia Brodsky at Cornell University on March 7, 2013

 

In Search of a Homeplace
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