The Common Receives Amazon Literary Partnership Grant for 2017

Amazon granrt

We are pleased to announce that The Common has been chosen to receive a 2017 Amazon Literary Partnership grant. This support will specifically help The Common to continue its work publishing and celebrating new writers and diverse voices from around the world.

The Amazon Literary Partnership supports nonprofit literary organizations that share Amazon’s obsession with empowering writers to create, publish, learn, teach, experiment, and thrive. The partnership provides grant funding to innovative groups that strive for a lasting impact not only on writers’ lives, but on the broader literary and publishing communities.

Read more about the Amazon Literary Partnership here. Contribute to support The Common here.

 

Amazon Literary Partnership and its logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates.

Emily EverettThe Common Receives Amazon Literary Partnership Grant for 2017

Related Posts

Issue 14 mead cover photo

Issue 14 Launch & Reading at the Mead

Join the staff and interns of The Common for our launch of Issue 14! Come to hear readings from our new issue and enjoy wine and cheese in the Mead Art Museum’s beautiful Rotherwas Room.  Free and open to the public – students, parents, and local lit lovers all welcome! Friday, November 5 5 –

Poetry Award

Leslie McGrath’s Poem for The Common Wins Gretchen Warren Award

Congratulations to TC contributor Leslie McGrath! Her poem “Encountering Franz Wright Along the Way,” published by The Common, has co-won the Gretchen Warren Award at the New England Poetry Club. It was published in September 2016; you can read it here. The Gretchen Warren Award was judged by Donald Vincent. Leslie shares the award with

Magazine Cover

Jennifer Acker Writes About Issue 11 in Amherst Magazine

Amherst Magazine recently published a piece by Editor in Chief Jennifer Acker about the difficulties and delights of bringing Issue 11, Tajdeed, into the world. The first of its kind in the US, this issue contained all Arabic fiction in translation – the work of 26 authors, five artists, 18 translators from 17 countries. It