The Common Young Writers Program Opens Applications for Summer 2021

Applications for The Common Young Writers Program are now closed.
If you’d like to hear from us when applications open for next year, please click here.
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Students with issues of The Common

Applications are now open for The Common Young Writers Program, which offers two two-week summer classes for high school students (rising 9-12). Students will be introduced to the building blocks of fiction and learn to read with a writer’s gaze. Taught by the editors and editorial assistants of Amherst College’s literary magazine, the summer courses (Level I and Level II) run Monday-Friday and are open to all high school students (rising 9-12). The program runs July 19-31.

The cost of the two-week program is $725 for Level I, and $875 for Level II. Full and partial need-based tuition waivers are available for both levels; we hope that no student will let financial difficulty prevent them from applying.

Click here for more information and details on how to apply.

The Common Young Writers Program Opens Applications for Summer 2021

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