Welcome Our New Board Members!

We would like to extend a warm welcome to W. Drake McFeely and Suketu Mehta, the two newest additions to The Common’s Board of Directors.

Headshot of McFeely

W. Drake McFeely has made his entire career at W. W. Norton and Company, founded in 1923 and today the largest independent publisher wholly owned by its employees. Hired as a college traveler upon graduation from Amherst College in 1976, he was promoted to assistant sales manager in 1980 and within a year had also become an editor. Named a vice president in 1990, he served as associate director of the college department from 1993-94 and in 1994 was named Norton’s fifth president. He has been a member of Norton’s Board of Directors since 1990 and is today that board’s chairman.

Click here to read his full bio.

Headshot of Suketu Mehta
Suketu Mehta is the New York-based author of Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found, which won the Kiriyama Prize and the Hutch Crossword Award, and was a finalist for the 2005 Pulitzer Prize, the Lettre Ulysses Prize, the BBC4 Samuel Johnson Prize, and the Guardian First Book Award. He has won the Whiting Writers’ Award, the O. Henry Prize, and a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship for his fiction. Mehta’s work has been published in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, National Geographic, Granta, Harper’s Magazine, Time, and Newsweek, and has been featured on NPR’s Fresh Air and All Things Considered.

Mehta is an Associate Professor of Journalism at New York University. He is currently working on a nonfiction book about immigrants in contemporary New York, for which he was awarded a 2007 Guggenheim fellowship. He has also written original screenplays for films, including New York, I Love You, and a novella What is Remembered (2016). Mehta was born in Calcutta and raised in Bombay and New York. He is a graduate of New York University and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

 

Read the news brief from Publisher’s Weekly.

Flavia MartinezWelcome Our New Board Members!

Related Posts

Budapest

The Hat

SCOTT LAUGHLIN
At this moment, it is night in Budapest, and a woman has left her hat in a restaurant. This restaurant is in Buda, yet she is already crossing the bridge into Pest. Yes—perhaps you didn't know—Budapest is not one place but two places split by a river. Like the woman separated from her hat. Perhaps we are all schizophrenics.

BBF logo

Visit TC at the Brooklyn Book Festival!

Love reading The Common and want to see our staff’s smiling faces in person? Stop by our table at the Brooklyn Book Festival this Sunday, September 17 from 10am-6pm at Table 347 in front of the courthouse. We’ll be giving away a special, tasty something while supplies last! For more information about the Festival marketplace and

Golden Legend Book Cover

Review: The Golden Legend

FRANCESCA DE ONIS-TOMLINSON
Instead of trucks and movers, who might accidentally defile the books, city school children will form a human chain and pass them through the streets from the old library to the new. Watching, Nargis marvels that they are moving as quickly “as objects rushing along on the rapids of a great river.”