Ask a Local: Dagoberto Gilb, Austin, TX

With DAGOBERTO GILB

Austin Texas Lake Front

 

In this month’s Ask A Local, Dagoberto Gilb offers us a glimpse of Austin, TX in the form of a micro-interview.

Your name: Dagoberto Gilb

Current city or town: Austin, Texas

How long have you lived here? 15 years 

Three words to describe the climate: very sweaty hot

Best time of year to visit? 3 months of fall and spring

 

1) The most striking physical features of this city/town are . . . 

Used to be the capitol, now the tower cranes, their booms like the economy here.

 

2) The stereotype of the people who live here and what this stereotype misses. . .

White tattooed scenesters. The stereotype doesn’t miss.

 

3) Historical context in broad strokes and the moments in which you feel this history. . .

A way nutz historical time now. My oldest son, a master’s in public policy, spent years taking shit survival jobs. He finally found a gig—in Kabul, Afghanistan, for a NATO contractor.

 

4) Local/regional vocabulary or food? 

Gucci cool fusions of Asian Texan Mexican and hippie except for the pork

 

5) Local politics and debates frequently seem to center on . . . 

A realized 60s dream, now gray-haired post hippie, very polite and well-organized.

 

Ask a Local: Dagoberto Gilb, Austin, TX

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