Fake: A Fable

By R. ZAMORA LINMARK

Fake alternative facts
Fake Big Brother, bisexual bystanders, blogs, boobs, bobos, blow-jobs, Born-Agains
Fake clowns, CCTV beheadings, chlamydia and climate change hysteria
Fake democratic doppelgangers, drive-by death squads, double-dead buffets
Fake emojis, ejaculating cows, ejected United passengers, erectile dysfunction do-it-yourself kits
Fake faux furs, fat-free, Fentanyl-induced full moonsFake gods in Gucci knock-offs
Fake hashish hashtags, hot dogs, human rights violations
Fake in-your-face-Facebook trolls, Instagram idiots
Fake jungle DNAs, Jurassic jujubes, justice-loaded guns
Fake killings, Korean missiles and Louis Vuittons
Fake liars, liberals, likers
Fake Made-in-China presidents, maximum security measures, meth-heads
Fake national press releases, NGOs, nail claws
Fake originals, organic orgasms, Oxford diplomas
Fake phantom pains, props, proclamations, propagandas, prosthetics
Fake quotable quote quotas
Fake rape jokes, resignations, rehab resurrections, Republic of Free-Deranged Chickens
Fake senators, soy, SPAM-colored sphincters, speculative fictionists
Fake terrorist wannabes, transgender allies, toddler tantrums
Fake universe of unicorns
Fake virgins and vigilantes
Fake weather-proofed wigs and whitening products
Fake Xanadu
Fake Zeligs, zirconias, and zombies
Fake you
Fake you too.

 

[Purchase Issue 18 here.]

R. Zamora Linmark is a Manila-born poet, novelist, and playwright. His latest poetry collection is Pop Vérité. This Fall, Delacorte/Random House will be publishing The Importance of Being Wilde at Heart, his first novel for young adults. He divides his time between Honolulu, Hawaii, and Baguio, Philippines.

Fake: A Fable

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