Hippocampus

By BINO A. REALUYO

 

Memory: a man cradles his son onshore,
pressing warm sea breeze on his tiny rebellion.
If men gave birth, what would become of gods?

I find myths in ruins. Aging now
and like pieces of shells—no wholes,
I ask: If I could find Love in Evolution,
why would it matter whom I desire?

Mythic bodies, each night wishing we were
seahorses. Milk turns to sea, ripples to waves,
fractals, choreographed strings of time.
Tongues blur dogma, I name my child,

Rebel,

an offering to the open sea, where light is salt,
seaweed, male pouches bearing young.

 

Bino A. Realuyo is the author of The Gods We Worship Live Next Door, winner of the 2005 Agha Shahid Ali Prize for Poetry. He has published poems in The Nation, the Kenyon Review, New Letters, and recent issues of ZYZZYVA, North American Review, Salamander, and New American Writing. “Hippocampus” is from his completed manuscript The Rebel Sonnets. In December 2019, the band U2 featured his poem in its Joshua Tree Anniversary Concert Tour in Manila. He is an adult educator and immigrant rights activist in NYC. Read more at binoarealuyo.com.

[Purchase Issue 19 here.]

Hippocampus

Related Posts

Ama Codjoe

Writers on Writing: Ama Codjoe

AMA CODJOE
Patience, in this case, seems to resemble listening, and in our everyday lives we can practice listening: giving people time to share what’s on their minds and in their hearts, noticing the trees will listen to you and speak back if you’ll slow down and walk amongst them.

Image of dental floss on red background

September 2020 Poetry Feature

BRUCE BOND
What you have heard is half true, half forgotten. / It’s what we have, a rubric written in old / blood whose spirit of inclusion admits / the occasional invention, the apocryphal / goat at midnight, for one, who has broken / down the gate again, and wandered through...

Ask a Local with José Pinto de Sá: Maputo, Mozambique

JOSÉ PINTO DE SÁ
Like hermit crabs, different inhabitants have occupied the conch shell of Maputo since the Portuguese first built the city in the late nineteenth century. Back then, the colonists lived in the “Cement” neighborhoods on the upper side overlooking the bay, in streets bordered by crimson acacias and jacarandas and with pretty houses surrounded by gardens.