Leslie McGrath’s Poem for The Common Wins Gretchen Warren Award

Congratulations to TC contributor Leslie McGrath! Her poem “Encountering Franz Wright Along the Way,” published by The Common, has co-won the Gretchen Warren Award at the New England Poetry Club. It was published in September 2016; you can read it here.

Poetry Award

The Gretchen Warren Award was judged by Donald Vincent. Leslie shares the award with Hilde Weisert for her poem “Ars Poetica.” View the full list of winners for all New England Poetry Club awards here.

Leslie’s work first appeared in The Common in Issue 07. Read those poems and more on our website.

Leslie McGrath

Leslie McGrath is a poet and literary interviewer. Winner of the 2004 Pablo Neruda Prize for poetry, she is the author of Opulent Hunger, Opulent Rage (2009), a poetry collection, and two chapbooks, Toward Anguish (2007) and By the Windpipe (2014.) McGrath’s satiric novella in verse, Out From the Pleiades, was published by Jaded Ibis Press in December 2014. Her poems have recently appeared widely, most recently in The AwlAgniSalamander, and The Common. She teaches creative writing and literature at Central Connecticut State University and is series editor of The Tenth Gate, a poetry imprint of The Word Works press (Washington, DC.) She lives in Essex, CT with her husband Bill Taylor, a shipwright.

Debbie WenLeslie McGrath’s Poem for The Common Wins Gretchen Warren Award

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December 2017 Poetry Feature

ALBERTO de LACERDA
To see you is to stay and remain, / To see you is finally to see; / I open my veins to life / As if an exceptional body / Desired my blood. / I discover everything in you. / You look in my eyes: you are / The liquid filling / The bridges of heaven and earth. / To see you is to forget fear, / To speak and not see the divisions / Words create. / To see you is to be a forest.