Muerto Rico

By ADÁL

Introduction by Mercedes Trelles Hernández here.

By Adal

Viviana García Meléndez Jumping Portrait, 2017

 

By Adal

Alex Millan Jumping Portrait, 2017

 

By Adal

Freddie Mercado, 2018
[Los dormidos]

By Adal

Carlos Cutito Soto, 2016
[Puerto Ricans Underwater/Los ahogados]

By Adal

Adriana Santiago + Marina Anton, 2016
[Puerto Ricans Underwater/Los ahogados]

By Adal

Ana Portnoy Brimmer, 2016
[Puerto Ricans Underwater/Los ahogados]

By Adal

Bold Destrou, 2017
[Puerto Ricans Underwater/Los ahogados]

By Adal

Damaris Cruz + David Zayas, 2018
[Los dormidos]

Adál is a photographer, graphic artist, and installation, performance, and alternative artist. He co-founded Foto Gallery in New York City with Alex Coleman in 1975, and was artist-in-residence at Light Work in 1986. He and poet Pedro Pietri founded the El Puerto Rican Embassy project in 1994. Adál is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Award, 2016, and his works are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, El Museo del Barrio, the San Francisco Museum of Fine Arts, and the Musee d’Art Modern de la Ville de Paris, among others. Among his published books are The Evidence of Things Not Seen, Falling Eyelids: A Foto Novela, Portraits of the Puerto Rican Experience, Out of Focus Nuyoricans, and 2017’s Puerto Ricans Underwater/Los Ahogados.

 

[Purchase Issue 16 here.]

Whitney BrunoMuerto Rico

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