Night. Transformations. Brooklyn.

By ANTON KISSELGOFF

lonely gowanus building

As night descends, the city’s fabric, examined at eye level, no longer exists as a continuum. Now a collection of autonomous constructs artificially created by various light sources, each structure possesses the mysteries that are hidden by day. My nightwalks around Brooklyn are focused on finding the fragments that form a different sense of place, almost unfamiliar, one that borders on the imaginary and disappears with the first light of day.

Bluewhale

Blue Whale

Boat House

Boathouse

Brooklyn Vernacular

Brooklyn Vernacular

Cleaners

Cleaners

Derelict

Derelict

Industrial 01

Industrial 01

Industrial 02

Industrial 02

Light Trails

Light Trails

Playground

Playground

Red Star

Red Star

Reflections

Reflections

The Entrance

 

Anton Kisselgoff studied painting, drawing and architectural composition at the St. Petersburg Academy of Fine Arts and later received a professional degree in Architecture from Cornell University.

Night. Transformations. Brooklyn.

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