Recurrence

By SEAN CHO A.

in the absence of wind: stillness of course.
the slowness of the leaves is a reminder
of the importance of scale. of time. scale
of time. the stillness in the branches becomes

a reminder of the limitations of home. a broken
branch in a child’s hand becomes a sword or
a magic wand depending on the bedtime stories

where were we again? the ever present loud

i’ve said it before: it all starts in the eye.
ends with i. there is hope in shame. hope
of change. right now. at this very moment:

 

Sean Cho A. is a visiting professor of instruction at a Midwestern university.

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Recurrence

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