Religion

By CRALAN KELDER
either you feel it or you don’t and I don’t feel a thing, nothing at all,
except I do feel a great warmth standing in the window in the front
of the sun and I think how fucking great it is to be alive I could almost
cry standing there watching the trees pollinating each other
and then I think that I could just as well be religious, all things being
random and equal, the day’s lottery, and I hope that if I did believe in
a god people would
leave
me to enjoy it, and not try to talk me out of it
I am not religious
rain comes
down across
cross bearer
comes down
dead
crossed lover
years later
still cross
that river get to the other side
finally sit down and have a rest

 

Cralan Kelder is the author of Give Some Word. His work has recently appeared in Zen Monster, Poetry Salzberg Review, and VLAK, among other publications. Kelder currently edits the literary magazines Full Metal Poem and Retort. He lives in Amsterdam with the evolutionary biologist Toby Kiers and their children.

[Purchase your copy of Issue 02 here.]

Religion

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