Translation

By ANANDA LIMA

I wait and weigh the odds
of me being who feeds
and feeds and scrolls through
feeds feeding on grey

matter de eu ser um ser que come
supported by skeleton feeding on
feeds que se alimentam de massa
cinzenta made of carbon as all living

things sustidas por esqueletos
com suas espinhas vertebrais
feitas de carbono como todos os seres
vivos como a coluna central do lápis

the ribless spine of pencil
lead pure carbon
os miolos cinzentos dos lápis
or graphite and clay

carbono puro eu
ser que navega e se alimenta
de grafite e argila de chance
de espera de caminho

 

Ananda Lima’s work has appeared or is forthcoming in The American Poetry Review, Poets.org, jubilat, Colorado ReviewRattleHayden’s Ferry ReviewHobart, and elsewhere. Her chapbook Translation won the Vella Chapbook Contest and will be published by Paper Nautilus in 2019. She has an MA in linguistics from UCLA and is a fiction MFA candidate at Rutgers University-Newark. Lima has taught at Montclair State University and UCLA and currently teaches undergraduate creative writing at Rutgers.

[Purchase Issue 17 here.]

Debbie WenTranslation

Related Posts

Image of trees and buildings

The Amherst Bulletin (excerpts)

SOFIA BELIMOVA
After the rain, we get slices / of the grey and yellow world / which slip through the earnest bunches of acorns / in sheets of diffuse, papery light. / To the west of campus simple houses / propagate drifts of dust and applewood in the dusk. / Creaking floorboards in an upstairs room

Cover of At Home in the New World

Review: Hurtling in the Same Direction – At Home in the New World

SUSAN TACENT
Maria Terrone’s grandparents were among the estimated nine million people who emigrated from Italy between 1881 and 1927. While her parents were born in the United States, her connection to Italy is deep, informing her identity and experiences as much as being a lifelong New Yorker has.

bustani headshot

Translation as Art: Against Flattening

HISHAM BUSTANI
The simultaneous, yet separate, publication of the English translations and their Arabic originals... affirms that the English and Arabic texts are intimately connected and yet distinct; that translation is creative work in its own right.