Embraceable

By JUAN CARLOS MARSET 

Translated by ILAN STAVANS 

 

Abrazable

A Piedad Bonnett

Irremplazable tú,

voz tú vacía

de mi vacío en ti

inconsolable.

Mi tú irremediable

tu mí espejo

de tu reflejo

en mí. Nada clavada

en tu silencio,

callada voz del sueño

desalmada

entre mi cuerpo

y el tuyo deshaciendo

este recuerdo

 

de mi abrazable tú,

voz tú que alientas

al ahuyentar el ángel

que nos dimos

cuando dijimos

lo que puede que nunca

nos haya sucedido.

 

Embraceable

To Piedad Bonnett

Irreplaceable you,

voice, your empty

of my inconsolable

emptiness in you.

My irremediable you,

you, my mirror

of your reflection

 

in me. Unforced

into your silence,

silent voice of heartless

dream

between my body

and yours, undoing

this memory

 

of my embraceable you,

you, voice that strengthens

while banishing the angel

we gave ourselves

when we said

what might never have

happened to us.

 

[Purchase Issue 13 here]

Juan Carlos Marset was born in Albacete, Spain, in 1963. He is editor-in-chief of the magazine Sibila, professor of aesthetics and theory of the arts at Universidad de Sevilla, and author of Puer profeta, Leyenda napolitana, Laberinto, and Días que serán, where “Abrazable/Embraceable” is included.

 

Ilan Stavans is publisher of Restless Books, Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College, and author of On Borrowed Words, Dictionary Days, and Quixote. His latest books are I Love My Selfie (with ADÁL), Pablo Neruda: All the Odes, and a Spanglish translation of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince.

Julia PikeEmbraceable

Related Posts

Front door in Dublin

Ask a Local: Caitriona Lally, Dublin, Ireland

CAITRIONA LALLY
Dublin is very much a port city and even though many of the former dockworkers lost their jobs with the arrival of industrialisation, I think it still has a port feel. There are still a few early houses near the docks—pubs that open early for workers coming off nightshifts.

Meditation on a Ficus Tree

DENISE DUHAMEL
mermaid legs/ whiskers/ open mouth/ callipygian bark/ semen sap/ elbow fold/ knees/ arms stretched above a head/ torso swung upside down/ hair sweeping the ground/ breasts/ cave turned inside out/ toes holding on/ eye socket/ palm/ thumb/ twisting veins/ freckle/

The Girls cover

Friday Reads: July 2017

Cline’s depiction of and insight into the mindset of preteen girls – the loneliness, insecurity, frustration – felt as clear and honest as the experience itself was twenty years ago. There is plenty of fiction that delves into longing between lovers, but I can’t think of another book I’ve read that discards that trope to focus on the desire and need for girls to connect with other girls, to find acceptance and family there.