Poem

By LOREN GOODMAN
 

A student once
Asked me: what
Is a poem? And
I looked at the
Student’s face—the
Student’s mouth was
Still open and I could
See deeply past gold-
Encrusted molars
Into the glistening
Cavity—and said, not
Remembering whether
I was the student
Or the teacher, “A
Poem is a face as empty
As the full page is blank.”

 

LOREN GOODMAN is the author of Famous Americans, selected by W. S. Merwin for the 2002 Yale Series of Younger Poets, Suppository Writing (2008), and New Products (2010). He is an associate professor of creative writing and English literature at Yonsei University / Underwood International College in Seoul, South Korea, and serves as the UIC Creative Writing Director.

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Debbie WenPoem

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