The Window

By MAKHOSAZANA XABA

You fitted so snugly
through the window I opened wide for you.
Then you shut it with a bang giving me your back.
The shards, too small, took forever to gather.
I put them in that wooden bowl you made.

Then I bought shatter-proof glass,
lined it with black blinds that do not open,
so that I will never be tempted
to open the window again.

Makhosazana Xaba is the author of These Hands and Tongues of Their Mothers.

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The Window

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