The Solidarity Book Project

By SONYA CLARK 

Sonya clark

The Solidarity Book Project was envisioned by Professor of Art and Art History Sonya Clark, as one way for Amherst College, in its Bicentennial year, to recommit to a more equitable future by pushing against legacies of settler colonialism and anti-Black racism.

This art initiative is open for public participation and engagement. For each response to the calls to action, the College will donate to organizations serving Black and Indigenous communities in need of book knowledge up to a total of $100,000. By participating in the project, you can become a part of our growing monument to solidarity while raising funds for Black and Indigenous communities.

For $100 matched donation, participate in #SolidaritySculpting by sculpting the iconic solidarity fist into pages of books that have shaped your understanding of solidarity. 

For a $75 matched donation, participate in #SolidarityReading by quoting a book that has shaped your thinking about solidarity.

For a $25 matched donation, participate in #SolidarityReflection by telling us what solidarity means to you or relay a story about someone who has modeled solidarity for you or for others.  

Find out how to participate here.

 

Scissors on book

Book near scissors

Solidarity book on books

Solidarity books three

Solidarity book array

The Solidarity Book Project

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