May 21st, 2015 | 6:00am


Joshua Mehigan reads his poem, “How Strange, How Sweet,” from Issue 06.

reviewed by Susan Tacent
May 18th, 2015 | 10:00am

Noir is not my regular genre. But I have read my fair share of Raymond Chandler, and I’ve seen The Big Sleep more than once. I’m from Brooklyn originally—Noir Central—and I’ve lived in Rhode Island for over 20 years. So I jumped at the opportunity to review Providence Noir, Brooklyn-based Akashic Books’s latest entry in its 11-year-old Noir series, atmospheric story collections set in cities all over the world.
 

Photo of Berlin Wall by Flickr Creative Commons user Gonzo Carles
May 13th, 2015 | 10:04am

Photo of Berlin Wall by Flickr Creative Commons user Gonzo Carles


Then

it was a

place refracted

by the prism of history and

still in a kind of shock

of the past,

when

you never knew

the station you’d come into

Photo from Young Frankenstein; by Flickr Creative Commons user Insomnia Cured Here
May 11th, 2015 | 6:00am

Photo from Young Frankenstein; by Flickr Creative Commons user Insomnia Cured Here

The last thing I remember about my father was him walking away wearing his camel coat. I remember him from the back, his dark hair escaping from his hat.

It was Christmas evening and it was cold, for Rome at least. He had just accompanied me to a train, which I would take to reach my cousins in Calabria. He was not happy that I was leaving, and would die a few hours later. A stroke, the doctors said.

The following day I took the train back to Rome, to find the house full of smoking people and my mother crying. I was 15 and my grandparents were all alive: it felt unnatural, like a house with a Nativity scene, but with a coffin.

I went to the movies the day after the funeral: cinema was something that I had shared with my father; it was a way to still be with him.

May 8th, 2015 | 6:00am

We’re taking this month to revisit books from our pasts, and find new ones that will stay with us. Some of these titles are old favorites, which have found their way back to their recommenders after years apart. Others are books long unread but known by reputation, “by proxy,” finally experienced. We are reading both echoes built on classics and violent shifts from the familiar. These are books both for everyone and specifically for you. They will linger with their recommenders—with all of us—long after reading, into “every possible future.”


Recommended: Junior College by Gary Soto, Karate Chop by Dorthe Nors, Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov, Remembering Babylon by David Malouf, Aeons by Max Rivto.