Photo by Flickr Creative Commons user Steve Guttman NYC
October 15th, 2014 | 8:00am

Photo by Flickr Creative Commons user Steve Guttman NYC

Today’s service is the blessing of the animals, and the congregation is clustered on the lawn with designer dogs on extendable leashes and mysterious scuttling boxes lined with hand towels and one leopard gecko that, waiting for its blessing, relieves itself on its young owner’s father. He scrubs at his shirt at the sink in the church basement, where J and I are helping to set up for the post-service coffee hour, halving banana bread and quartering bagels and decimating cantaloupe. The man blessed by his son’s gecko may need to be reminded of the copy on the service’s tri-fold program: We do not bless animals to make them holy; we bless them because they are already holy.

Photo by Flickr Creative Commons user Eric Tillotson; image cropped slightly
October 14th, 2014 | 6:00am

Photo by Flickr Creative Commons user Eric Tillotson; image cropped slightly

I did not know who Bowe Bergdahl was when I first heard about him on the news in June. I followed his rehabilitation, which was briefly reported for a week or so and happened in ordinary details. Sergeant Bergdahl was returned from Afghanistan through a prisoner exchange with the Taliban, who had held him for five years. He was welcomed back by his parents and President Obama in front of the White House press corps in the Rose Garden.

reviewed by Sophie Murguia
October 13th, 2014 | 6:00am

It’s hard for anyone to write a magical realist novel today without inviting comparisons to Gabriel García Márquez. Especially in the wake of his death this year, the Colombian literary giant has been mythologized as the master of blurring the lines between reality and fantasy. Tiphanie Yanique’s debut novel Land of Love and Drowning is a magical realist work that calls to mind García Márquez, yet still manages to stake out new territory—both geographic and literary.

Photo by Flickr Creative Commons user 3nglishN3rd
October 10th, 2014 | 6:00am

Photo by Flickr Creative Commons user 3nglishN3rd

There is a book that, while neither historical nor scientific, stands apart from works of literature, religion and philosophy. Like those works, this book betrays a great deal about the culture in which it appears. Yet it differs from them in at least two respects. First, it can evolve; second, it lacks an author. As James Murray has written, the book “is the creation of no one man, and of no one age; it is a growth that has slowly developed itself down the ages; its beginnings lie far back in times almost pre-historic.”

Photo by author
October 9th, 2014 | 6:00am

Photo by author

Your name: Jason Hardung

Current city or town:  Fort Collins, Colorado

How long have you lived here? I moved here from Cheyenne, Wyoming in 2003. Although, some family members have lived here my whole life, so I wasn’t brand new to Ft. Collins. I have been coming here to visit my whole life.