Photo by author
October 9th, 2014 | 6:00am

Photo by author

Your name: Jason Hardung

Current city or town:  Fort Collins, Colorado

How long have you lived here? I moved here from Cheyenne, Wyoming in 2003. Although, some family members have lived here my whole life, so I wasn’t brand new to Ft. Collins. I have been coming here to visit my whole life.


Photo by author
October 8th, 2014 | 6:00am

Photo by author

With a respectful snap she beckons. She points to capital letter-less prose. Purple ink. I’s dotted with hearts or stars.  

“Sir, what does it mean ‘What is your tribal name?’”

“She wants to know if you have an Oshiwambo name.” I nod to the girl beside her, Ndilimeke, whose name in English means I am in hand. A name for children of difficult births, who need a mid-wife’s hand to draw them out of the womb.

October 7th, 2014 | 6:00am

Judith Frank is the author of the novel, Crybaby Butch, and a professor of English at Amherst College. She received a B.A. from Hebrew University in Jerusalem and a Ph.D. in English literature and an M.F.A. in creative writing from Cornell. She has been the recipient of a grant from the National Endowment of the Arts, and support from both Yaddo and MacDowell. Marni and Judith spoke online about Judy’s new novel, All I Love and Know, and what it means to write about violence in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Photo by Flickr Creative Commons user jcsullivan24
October 6th, 2014 | 6:00am

Photo by Flickr Creative Commons user jcsullivan24

In Henry David Thoreau’s essay “Walking” he writes, “Give me a wildness whose glance no civilization can endure.” It is this longing for wildness that drove Thoreau to live and continue to return to Walden pond; to seek out nature whether along rivers, or the seashore, in the Maine woods, or his home town.

But at times Nature complicates Thoreau’s idealism by presenting raw, untamed forcestrue wilderness, rather than just wildnessthat stand in stark contrast to the pastoral that he often evokes in his writing.  

Image by Flickr Creative Commons user UO Journal
October 3rd, 2014 | 6:00am

Image by Flickr Creative Commons user UO Journal

The continent, it turned out, was not ready for people. The settlers chopped down every tree and killed every animal, then started in on each other. They hoarded finite resources—furs, lumber, ore—until there werent any left to use. Counterfeiters discovered a way to alchemize gold, bringing about hyperinflation and economic collapse. The strong terrorized the weak, not just once but repeatedly, hounding them through one life after another. Normal people became outright thugs, enacting fantasies of domination. Dominated people had a tendency to become informal police, enacting fantasies of justice. Every so often a server crash would plunge everyone weeks into the past, to the most recent backup.