May 2013 Poetry Feature

Don Share published three poems, including “Wishbone,” the title poem of his newest collection, in the first issue of The Common. He’s been on a roll ever since, publishing five books as author, translator, or editor in the last year and a half. Here are a few selections from and links to those volumes:

fish

From Wishbone

From Bunting’s Persia

An excerpt from “Carp Ascending a Waterfall”

From Miguel Hernandeztranslated by Don Share

From Field GuideDarío Jaramillo Agudelo, translated by Don Share

“Everything is filled with you”

“Morgualos”

The Open Door: 100 Poems, 100 Years of Poetry Magazineedited by Don Share and Christian Wiman

And finally, last summer, while blogging for Best American PoetryTC poetry editor John Hennessy wrote an appreciation of Wishbone

Don Share is Senior Editor of Poetry. His books include Squandermania (Salt Publishing), Union (Zoo Press), Seneca in English (Penguin Classics), and most recently a new book of poems, Wishbone (Black Sparrow) and Bunting’s Persia (Flood Editions, a 2012 Guardian Book of the Year). 

May 2013 Poetry Feature

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